Category: Drugs

Scotland in grip of national emergency as drugs epidemic tears apart generation

Scotland’s failure to counter its growing drugs menace has become a national emergency.

A death rate which was slipping out of control as far back as 2007 has now reached epidemic proportions – especially when compared with our European neighbours.

Starting tomorrow, the Record will publish a new series of articles which will ask: What can be done about
Scotland’s drug deaths?

Featuring many voices and perspectives, we will speak to academics who are at odds with each other’s
ideological stances, as well as GPs and recovery specialists running residential abstinence programmes.

We will also feature heart-rending tales from ordinary people whose lives have been blighted by drug dependency – including long-term drug users and their families.

Their revelations make clear that, for every life lost to drugs, there are many others blighted by the mental scars associated with tragedy – sisters, brothers, sons, daughters, mums , dads and more.

Some of the questions asked include:

● Have the benefits of the methadone and other opiate replacement therapies been shattered by the explosion in cheap street drugs?

● Are too many people “parked” on methadone for decades?

● Should more funds be set aside to bring more people into properly supervised ORT regimes, rather than be driven to street drugs?

● Is it right that the UK Government believes a lifetime on methadone might be regarded as a successful outcome for some?

● Should drugs laws be devolved and should this lead Scotland to decriminalise drug possession, set up safe consumption rooms and move to genuinely radical action?

● Is decent housing the key to meaningful lives and should this become the focus of massive Government funding?

● Should we fund more long-term residential abstinence-based detox programmes?

● Should we promptly establish a proper register of how many people are on methadone and ascertain how many are moving towards a life free from drugs?

 

Our forum will feature politicians and GPs whose jobs have given them first-hand knowledge of the way drugs are wrecking the lives of their patients and constituents. And we will investigate genuinely radical moves that are being made on a small scale to bring life skills to those prepared to be abstinent on long-term residential, community-based programmes.

The Record has heard many stories over the years of people whose only wish is to get clear of methadone, amid claims by many they are being “held” – sometimes against their will – on such programmes.

A review of methadone in 2013, after our series of stories, promised much but resulted in no improvement.

The number of methadone deaths rocketed from 237 at the time of the inquiry to 2013 to 439 in 2017. Heroin related deaths more than doubled in the same period and benzo-diazepine deaths rocketed from 196 to 552, as street “benzos” like diazepam and etizolam took hold of Scottish streets with devastating effect.

Many academics and GPs stress the huge risk of overdose and relapse for those who try to get free of drugs too quickly.

Prominent experts believe reducing the stigma against drug addicts is the best way to begin solving the problem.

The Record accept there is no easy solution.

 

Source: Scotland in grip of national emergency as drugs epidemic tears apart generation

Drugs in Scotland 2019 : The problem continues

Scottish criminal law – drugs

The Scottish Parliament highlighted just what severe and longstanding problems we have with drugs misuse in Scotland when the Road to Recovery Drug Strategy was launched back in 2008. Despite this programme, recorded figures for 2015 showed a spike in drug-related deaths, giving a total of 706.

Increase in drugs uses in the West of Scotland.

Here at Berlow Rahman Solicitors, we’re fully aware of just how big a problem drugs still are in Scotland, as our caseload has increased considerably over the past 20 years. We are experts in criminal law and can provide you with a professional solicitor if you’ve been charged under the Misuse of Drugs Act.

 

Our sympathetic and knowledgeable lawyers have all the expertise needed within this complex arena of criminal law. Although many cases we deal with have related to the use of cannabis and weed cultivation. We have also handled criminal law cases relating to heroin, valium/ Xanax, steroids, legal highs, sleeping tablets and a lot more.

 

How we can help with your drugs charge in Scotland

 

We understand the real trauma experienced by friends and families due to the compulsion to take drugs that impacts drug addicts, and we also appreciate all the factors that can drive anybody to supply drugs commercially. Our understanding solicitors are not here to judge you but have a sincere interest in assisting clients charged with drug-related offences.

If you’ve never involved in any criminal charges related to drugs in the past, you may just be charged with one offence by the police. However, there are certain serious drugs offences which can result in long prison sentences.

Let the professional criminal lawyers at Berlow Rahman handle your Scottish drugs offence problem at the very earliest opportunity. This way, we will have plenty of time to prepare your defence and manage all related legal issues.

We handle all kinds of drug-related offences, including Possession, Possession with Intent to Supply, Cannabis Cultivation, charges if you’re concerned in the Supply of a Controlled Drug and also Allowing your Premises to be Used for the Production or Supply of Illegal Drugs. Drug trafficking charges are extremely serious, as they often relate to large quantities of illicit drugs or individuals smuggling drugs through customs at airports or ferry terminals. If you’re charged with a drugs traffic offence, it’s possible you could face a long term in prison.

Our expert solicitors can offer you the comprehensive advice that could make a difference between an acquittal or a conviction, so don’t hesitate to get in touch with a Criminal lawyer at Berlow Rahman to find out more.